SICKLE CELL TRAIT, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND OUTCOMES: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

Main Article Content

Diego A Vargas-Hernández https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2584-5195
Adriana Catalina Uscategui-Ruiz https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6556-9415
Andrés Jesus Prada-Rueda
Consuelo Romero-Sánchez

Keywords

Sickle Cell Trait, Splenic Infarction, Splenic Diseases, Spleen, Hemoglobinopathies

Abstract

Introduction: Sickle cell trait (SCT) is an autosomal recessive blood disorder in which patients are heterozygous carriers for hemoglobin S (HbAS) and are usually asymptomatic. We performed a descriptive analysis of clinical manifestations and outcomes associated with SCT.


Methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study that included patients with SCT from 2014 to 2020 at Hospital Militar Central, the reference center of the Military forces in Bogota, Colombia.


Results: Of 647 hemoglobin electrophoresis analyzed, we identified 51 patients with SCT, including 43 males (84.3%) and eight females (15.7%), with a median age of 22 years (IQR 15–36 years). Of these, 28 (54.8%) were Afro-Colombian, and 23 (45.1%) were Colombian mestizos. Twenty-four patients (47.1%) were asymptomatic, and Twenty-seven patients (52.9%) were symptomatic (systemic complications); splenic complications were the most important (85.2%), p=0.0005, and there was a wide spectrum of splenic complications. We found significant elevations in leukocytes, bilirubin, LDH, and CRP. Eighteen patients (66.7%) received medical management, five patients (18.5%) required splenectomy, and only 5.9% of patients were sent for genetic counseling.


Conclusions: Splenic complications were the most relevant in symptomatic patients. Most patients received medical treatment, and 18.5% of patients required splenectomy. Our results reflect the absence of redirection of these patients to genetic counseling.


 

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